Jan 16, 2012

Easyway to Learn Protocol -Glossary Part-X


802.1ad, an IEEE standard also referred to as "Q-in-Q" tag stacking, builds on the IEEE's 802.1Q (Virtual LANs) to enable stacked VLANs. IEEE 802.1ad is an amendment to IEEE standard IEEE 802.1Q-1998, intended to develop an architecture and bridge protocols to provide separate instances of the MAC services to multiple independent users of a Bridged Local Area Network in a manner that does not require cooperation among the users, and requires a minimum of cooperation between the users and the provider of the MAC service.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1ad

802.1D is an IEEE specification which defines Spanning-Tree Protocol (STP). STP is a link management protocol that provides path redundancy while preventing undesirable loops in the network. For an Ethernet network to function properly, only one active path can exist between two stations. Loops occur in networks for a variety of reasons. The most common reason for loops in networks is a deliberate attempt to provide redundancy -- in case that one link or switch fails, another link or switch can take over.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1d

IEEE 802.1p specification enables Layer 2 switches to prioritize traffic and perform dynamic multicast filtering. The prioritization specification works at the media access control (MAC) framing layer. The 802.1p standard also offers provisions to filter multicast traffic to ensure it does not proliferate over layer 2-switched networks.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1p

802.1Q is an IEEE standards, also known as virtual LAN (VLAN), which allows multiple bridged networks to transparently share the same physical network link without leakage of information between networks. IEEE 802.1Q also defines the meaning of a virtual LAN or VLAN with respect to the specific conceptual model underpinning bridging at the MAC layer and to the IEEE 802.1D spanning tree protocol.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1q

802.1s is an IEEE standard for the Multiple Spanning Tree (MST) Protocol, which was based on the Cisco's Multiple Instances Spanning Tree Protocol (MISTP). MST combines the best aspects from both the Cisco Per-VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST+) and the 802.1q. The idea is that several VLANs can be mapped to a reduced number of spanning tree instances because most networks do not need more than a few logical topologies.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1s

802.1w is an IEEE standard which defines the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), an evolution of the Spanning Tree Protocol. RSTP provides for faster spanning tree convergence after a topology change. RSTP provides a loop free topology for any LAN or bridged network.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1w

802.1x is an IEEE standard for port-based network access control, particularly useful for securing 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs). The IEEE 802.1X offers an effective framework for authenticating and controlling user traffic to a protected network, as well as dynamically varying encryption keys. 802.1X ties a protocol called EAP (Extensible Authentication Protocol) to both the wired and wireless LAN media and supports multiple authentication methods, such as token cards, Kerberos, one-time passwords, certificates and public key authentication. Therefore, 802.1X is also known as EAP over LAN (EAPOL).
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.1x

802.20 is an IEEE standard of Mobile Broadband Wireless Access (MBWA) by specifying new mobile air interfaces for wireless broadband. 802.20 is a competing standard with 802.16e. 802.16e, based on 802.16a, adds mobility in the 2 to 6 GHz licensed bands, while 802.20, a brand new standard, aims for operation in licensed bands below 3.5GHz and with a peak data rate of over 1 Mbit/s.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.20

802.22 is an IEEE standard for Wireless Regional Area Networks (WRAN). IEEE 802.22 specifies a cognitive air interface for fixed, point-to-multipoint, wireless regional area networks that operate on unused channels in the VHF/UHF TV bands between 54 and 862 MHz. Signals at these frequencies can propagate 40 km or more from a well-sited base station, depending on terrain.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.22

IEEE 802.3ab, also known as 1000BaseT, is a standard for gigabit ethernet over copper wiring cable (Cat 5e or better). 1000BASE-T uses all four cable pairs for simultaneous transmissions in both directions through the use of echo cancellation and a 5-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-5) technique.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3ab

IEEE 802.3ad defines the technology called Ethernet link aggregation. Link aggregation is a computer networking term which describes using multiple Ethernet network cables/ports in parallel to increase the link speed beyond the limits of any one single cable or port. Other terms for this also include "ethernet trunk", "NIC teaming", "port teaming", "port trunking", "NIC bonding" and "link aggregate group" (LAG).
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3ad

802.3ae is an IEEE 10-Gigabit Ethernet standard, which offers data speeds up to 10 billion bits per second but preserves similar benefits to those of the preceding Ethernet standard. 10-Gigabit Ethernet is used to interconnect local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and metropolitan area networks (MANs). 10-Gigabit Ethernet uses the familiar IEEE 802.3 Ethernet media to access control (MAC) protocol and its frame format and size. However, it supports the full duplex mode but not the half-duplex operation mode, and it only functions over optical fiber. So it does not need the carrier-sensing multiple-access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol as it is used in other Ethernet standards.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3ae

802.3af (often erroneously called 802.11af) is an IEEE standard which describes a mechanism for Power over Ethernet (PoE). The standard provides the capability to deliver both power and data over standard Ethernet cabling. Power over Ethernet enables remote devices (such as VoIP phones or Wireless Access Points) to operate without a separate power source. The elimination of line voltage AC power simplifies equipment installation and fosters safety in most areas.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3af

802.3ah, an IEEE Data-link OAM specification, provides utilities for monitoring and troubleshooting Ethernet links, which are vital for carrier deployment. The IEEE 802.3ah EFM specification defines OAM as an optional sublayer just above the Ethernet media access controller (MAC). The OAM sublayer consists of a parser block, a multiplexer block, and a control block. All three blocks communicate with an OAM client, which is the "brains of the IEEE 802.3ah management architecture.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3ah

802.3u is an IEEE standard for the Fast Ethernet (100BASE-T). Fast Ethernet has the same frame format, MAC mechanisms, and MTU as the original Ethernet. Such similarities allow the use of existing 10BaseT applications and network management tools on Fast Ethernet networks.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3u

802.3z is an IEEE standard for the Gigabit Ethernet over fiber and cable, which has a physical media standard 1000Base-X (1000BaseSX C short wave covers up to 500m, and 1000BaseLX C long wave covers up to 5km). The IEEE 802.3ab defines the Gigabit Ethernet over the unshielded twisted pair wire (1000Base-T covers up to 75m).
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.3z

You might like: "Easyway to Learn Protocol -Glossary 1 to VI" on http://simplenetworktips.blogspot.com

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