Jan 16, 2012

Easyway to Learn Protocol -Glossary Part-VIII


802.11a is an extension to IEEE 802.11 that applies to wireless LANs and provides up to 54 Mbps in the 5GHz band. 802.11a uses an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) encoding scheme rather than FHSS or DSSS. 802.11a, actually newer than 802.11b, offers significantly more radio channels than the 802.11b and has a shorter range than 802.11g. It isn't compatible with 802.11b.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11a

802.11b, also referred to as 802.11 High Rate or Wi-Fi, is an extension to IEEE 802.11 that applies to wireless LANS and provides 11 Mbps transmission (with a fallback to 5.5, 2 and 1 Mbps) in the 2.4 GHz band. 802.11b uses only DSSS. 802.11b was a ratification to the original 802.11 standard, allowing wireless functionality comparable to Ethernet.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11b

802.11e, an IEEE standard, is the quality-of-service specification over a LAN, in particular, the 802.11 Wi-Fi standard. The standard is considered of critical importance for delay-sensitive applications, such as Voice over Wireless IP and Streaming Multimedia. The protocol enhances the IEEE 802.11 Media Access Control (MAC) layer.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11e

802.11g is an extension to IEEE 802.11 which offers wireless transmission over relatively short distances at 20 C 54 Mbps in the 2.4 GHz band. The 802.11g also uses the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) encoding scheme. 802.11g is compatible with older 802.11b.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11g

802.11i
802.11i, also called Wi-Fi Protected Access 2 (WPA 2), is the standard for WLAN security. IEEE 802.11i enhances the WEP (Wireline Equivalent Privacy), a technology used for many years for the WLAN security, in the areas of encryption, authentication and key management. WPA 2 supports the 128-bit-and-above Advanced Encryption Standard, along with 802.1x authentication and key management features. It also uses TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) which rotates key periodically to improve WLAN security. 
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11i

802.11j
802.11j is the IEEE standard to the 802.11 family of standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs) for 4.9 GHz - 5 GHz frequency use of WLAN systems in Japan.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11j

802.11k
The 802.11k is the Radio Resource Management standard to provide measurement information for access points and switches to make wireless LANs run more efficiently. It may, for example, better distribute traffic loads across access points or allow dynamic adjustments of transmission power to minimize interference.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11k

802.11n
802.11n is the IEEE Standard for WLAN enhancements for higher throughput designed to raise effective WLAN throughput to more than 100Mbit/sec. and to cover a range up to 400 meters. IEEE 802.11n technology is also known as Multiple Input, Multiple Output (MIMO).
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11n

802.11r
The 802.11r is the Fast Roaming standard to address-maintaining connectivity as a user moves from one access point to another. This is especially important in applications that need low latency and high quality.
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11r

802.11s
802.11s, an IEEE standard, is designed to deal with mesh networking in wireless communication. It is predicted to be ratified in mid-2008
Standard Organization: IEEE
Reference Document: IEEE 802.11s

802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are elements of the IEEE 802.11 family of specifications. 802.11x should not be mistaken for any one of its elements because there is no single 802.11x standard. The 802.11 family currently includes six over-the-air modulation techniques that all use the same protocol. The most popular (and prolific) techniques are those defined by the b, a, and g amendments to the original standard; security was originally included and was later enhanced via the 802.11i amendment. 802.11n is another new modulation technique. Other standards in the family (c–f, h, j) are service enhancements and extensions or corrections to previous specifications. 802.11b was the first widely accepted wireless networking standard, followed by 802.11a and 802.11g.
Standard Organization: IEEE

You might like: "Easyway to Learn Protocol -Glossary 1 to VI" on http://simplenetworktips.blogspot.com

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